Image Resolution

I recently read an article on iStockphoto about image resolution. Many people get confused when it comes to amount of pixels versus pixels per inches (ppi, also known as dots per inch or dpi). As a graphic design professional, I have known many professional designers who didn’t understand the difference. iStockphoto’s article gives a very good overview of the difference and explains how to calculate the total inches (or centimeters) of an image based on the ppi and total pixels.

Photoshop users have it easy. The Image Size dialog box automatically calculates the inches for you based on the resolution you need. The most important thing to remember when changing an image’s resolution from 72 ppi to a printable resolution is to uncheck the Resample Image checkbox at the bottom of the dialog box. If the box is checked, you will pixelate your image and it will be unusable.

The most important thing to remember about image size is the resolution is not important – the total pixels are. The resolution can be changed, but the total pixels need to stay the same to avoid pixelation. A 3000×4000 pixel 72 ppi image can be changed to 300 ppi, but the 3000×4000 pixels must NOT be changed. There are techniques to get around this in a pinch, but changing the amount of pixels should be avoided unless absolutely necessary.

To figure out the measurement of the picture in inches, you will need to divide the number of pixels by the resolution. A 3000×4000 pixel image at 72 ppi will be roughly 41.6″x55.5″. When the image is changed to 300 ppi, it will be 10″x13.3″.

And remember…not all images need to be printed at 300 ppi. It really depends on the project and the printer.


Flash Basics Tutorial #3: Creating 3d Text

How to create 3d looking text.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsIwH3LZiq4

In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to create text and make it look 3d.

Concepts learned:

  • Breaking Apart Objects
  • Changing Fill Colors
  • Copying and Pasting
  • Snapping
  • Using the Gradient Transform Tool
  • Using the Line Tool
  • Using the Text Tool
  • Using the Zoom Tool
  • Using Undo
  • Working with Text
  • Working with Gradients

Flash Basics Tutorial #1: Creating a Bouncing Ball

The first in my new series of Flash tutorials is now live on YouTube. Just click the video or the link below the video to watch it.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2S9BXYiP9Tc

In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to create a bouncing ball.

Concepts learned:

  • Using the Oval Tool and Line Tool
  • Using the Color Palette
  • Creating Symbols
  • Inserting Frames and Keyframes
  • Using Guide Layers
  • Creating Classic Tweens

Flash Basics Video Tutorials

I filmed a short tutorial earlier today about some of the basics of Flash. It’s the first in a planned series of Flash basics video tutorials. The videos will be all about really simple things that can be done in Flash, basically tailored to the absolute beginner. The first one is less than ten minutes long and goes over how to make a bouncing ball in Flash. It should be edited in the next few days, and then I will post it on here and on YouTube.


The 10 Commandments of the PC Tech

LearnKey recently posted a video on YouTube and their blog called “The 10 Commandments of a PC Tech”. The video is an unused segment we shot during the filming of the A+ Certification training with Mike Meyers back in September 2009. It was decided that the segment needed finished and released as a promotional item, so my coworker Steve has been working on it tirelessly for the last little while. When I moved to the Salt Lake office I was conscripted for the video, so viewers playing close attention (and not so close attention) can see my mug sprinkled throughout.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBI7srCSpd0&playnext=1&videos=TXUhWTniwmQ